Video and podcast archive

Browse Methods in Ecology and Evolution's archived videos, podcasts and tutorials below.
You can view by issue, view all content, or return to the current volumes.

Volume 3

Issue 4


Encounternet

Uploaded 16th May 2012

Dan Mennill, University of Windsor, presents his work with colleagues Stéphanie Doucet, Kara-Anne Ward, Dugan Maynard, Brian Otis and John Burt on 'A novel digital telemetry system for tracking wild animals: a field test for studying mate choice in a lekking tropical bird'. Encounternet is a novel digital telemetry system for tracking wild animals. The system is composed of two components: a radio tag and a receiver radio telemetry station. Dan Mennill, University of Windsor, shows how the system works and its advantages over other systems.

 

Microphone array

Uploaded 16th May 2012

Dan Mennill, University of Windsor, presents his work with colleagues Matthew Battiston, David Wilson, Jennifer Foote and Stéphanie Doucet, on a 'Field test of an affordable, portable, wireless microphone array for spatial monitoring of animal ecology and behaviour'. In this video Dan shows how this technology provides new opportunities for studying animal ecology and behaviour and has many advantages over tracking technologies that require capturing animals and fitting them with external devices, or technologies that focus on one individual in isolation of the activities of nearby animals.

 

Podcast with slideshow by Doug Yu

Uploaded 26th July 2012

Doug Yu, Chinese Academy of Science, has put together this interesting slide show that relates to his article recently published in MEE, entitled Biodiversity soup: metabarcoding of arthropods for rapid biodiversity assessment and biomonitoring.

 

Volume 3

Issue 3

BaSTa

Uploaded 19th March 2012

Fernando Colchero, Owen Jones and Maren Rebke, Max Plank Institute for Demographic Research, present their BaSTA -Bayesian Survival Trajectory Analysis - have put together this beautiful video exploring research on ageing and and how to deal with incomplete data. Starring Tim Coulson, Imperial College, Fernando Colchero, Owen Jones, James Vaupel, Max Plank Institute for Demographic Research, Annette Baudisch, MPIRG for Modeling the evolution of aging, Saskia Hin, Laboratory of historical demography, MPIDR. It also shows special cuts at the end!

 

Mvabund

Uploaded 14th March 2012

David Warton, The University of New South Wales, Australia, presents his 'mvabund' package on multivariate analysis. What makes this software different from other ones on multivariate analysis, is that it's all about models that you can fit to your data. David explains how to look at the properties of your data and the common pitfalls in modelling multivariate data. He also goes through how to fit generalised linear models to your data. Do check David's dancing!

 

Podcast with slideshow by Sarah Papworth

Uploaded 5th March 2012

Sarah Papworth and Nils Bunnefeld, Imperial College London, applied ecological methods and principles to GPS data on human movement to investigate the differences in movement ecology and habitat selection in human hunters and non hunters who return to a central place.
 

Please note this is an mp4 file, to listen or download the mp3 file of the podcast click here.
If you are experiencing any problems listening to the podcast, please download flash player. Image © 2012 Sarah Papworth.

 

Network analyses of animal movement

Uploaded 14th February 2012

David Jacoby, Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom and University of Exeter, and Edd Brooks, Cape Eleuthera Institute and University of Plymouth, explain how to combine two growing fields: biotelemetry and network analyses to gain a greater understanding of animal movements. The video contains some nice shark footage.

 

Prezi by Rupert Collins

Uploaded 23rd January 2012

Rupert Collins, co-author with Laura Boykin, Rob Cruickshank ad Karen Armstrong, of Barcoding's next top model: an evaluation of nucleotide substitution models for specimen identification, has put together this Prezi (a presentation that helps to visualize ideas). The presentation showcases whether the Kimura’s two-parameter substitution model (K2P), the de facto standard for constructing genetic distance matrices, is a good fit for identifying specimens at the species level.

A sample image of Rupert Collin's prezi
The tutorial is available to view from Prezi

 

Volume 3

Issue 2

Evolution MegaLab: A case study in citizen science

Uploaded 7th November 2011

Jonathan Silvertown, Open University, gives a demonstration of Evolution MegaLab, a collaboration exploring the use of citizen science methods to undertake a huge, trans-national survey of polymorphism in a wild species.

Jonathan demonstrates the site's display of historical polymorphism data, some features designed to enable researchers to assess the reliability of volunteer-gathered data, and the process by which anyone can add newly gathered data to the project database.
 

Modelling static and dynamic variables

Uploaded 30th September

Jessica Stanton, Stony Brook University, discusses the challenge of combining variables with very different tempos when preparing species distribution models under climate change.

Volume 3

Issue 1

Tutorial by Jeff Powell

Uploaded 16th June 2011

Jeff Powell, author of Accounting for uncertainty in species delineation during the analysis of environmental DNA sequence data, has put together an excellent tutorial to guide people through the implementation of his objective, theory-based method for predicting species boundaries, which explicitly incorporates uncertainty in the classification system into biodiversity estimation.

The tutorial is available to view and download from Slideshare, and the relevant R code can be found as supplementary material on Wiley Online Library.

 

Video with Brett Favaro

Uploaded 29th June 2011

Lead author Brett Favaro walks us through the construction of TrapCam, an inexpensive, self-contained camera system designed to deliver high-definition video footage of deepwater animals at depths inaccessible for scuba divers, which does not require ongoing support from a vessel, or need special apparatus to deploy and retrieve.

Summary: Brett takes us through the construction of the TrapCam system, followed by footage of the retrival of a unit following deployment, and some eerie images obtained by TrapCam in action.

Volume 2

Issue 6

Measuring the importance of species to ecosystems
Uploaded 25th August 2011

Nicholas Gotelli, University of Vermont, and Fernando T. Maestre, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, discuss the introduction of simple randomization tests for quantifying the effect of species on ecosystem variables, formalising the use of "natural experiments" to explore their contribution to ecosystem function.
Read the article: Randomization tests for quantifying species importance to ecosystem function
Watch the video on our YouTube channel.


 

Estimating seed predation rates
Uploaded 20th June 2011

Adam Davis demonstrates how field experiments and statistical models can can enable the extrapolation of long-term seed predation rates from short-term data.
Read the article: Temporal scaling of episodic point estimates of seed predation to long-term predation rates
Watch the video on our YouTube channel.


 

 

Volume 2

Issue 5

Population synchrony and functional connectivity
Uploaded 5th January 2012

Gary Powney and Tom Oliver show how long-term monitoring data on Speckled Wood butterflies can be used to inform conservation measures.
Read the article: Measuring functional connectivity using long-term monitoring data
Watch the video on our YouTube channel.


 

 

Heating up the forest
Uploaded 6th July 2011

Shannon Pelini demonstrates experimental equipment designed to test the effects of warmer climates on forest ecosystems - and, particuarly, arthropods.
Read the article: Heating up the forest: open-top chamber warming manipulation of arthropod communities at Harvard and Duke Forests
Watch the video on our YouTube channel.


 

Volume 2

Issue 4

The impact of sampling with replacement

Uploaded 23rd March 2011


 
Summary: Gurutzeta Guillera-Arroita explains the ideas behind their latest paper, published in Methods in Ecology and Evolution, looking at the impact of sampling with replacement in ecological studies of species occupancy. Gurutzeta discusses the impact of partial occupancy on such studies, highlighting the necessity of a careful understanding of a system before deciding whether to sample with replacement.

Music © 2008 DoKashiteru: http://ccmixter.org/files/DoKashiteru/16396
Licensed under: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.5/
Read the article: Impact of sampling with replacement in occupancy studies with spatial replication

Volume 2

Issue 3

Podcast with Jason Knouft

Uploaded 29th November 2010

Jason Knouft, from Saint Louis University, Missouri, talks to Elizabeth Horne, MEE Journal Coordinator, about his recently published paper, "Using fine-scale GIS data to assess the relationship between intra-annual environmental niche variability and population density in a local stream fish assemblage".


Summary: Jason establishes the need for broad-scale geographic considerations of ecological issues, and explains how the application of these methods on a finer scale can yield new and valuable insights into the exploitation of ecological niches by local populations, and such populations’ likely reactions to new seasonal and environmental stresses.

Click on the play button to listen to this podcast, or listen to the podcast here. If you are experiencing any problem listening to the podcast, please download flash player. Image © 2010 Jason Knouft.

Volume 2

Issue 2

Video with Fraser Lewis

Uploaded 21st January 2011

Fraser Lewis talks about testing new methods to compare non-nested statistical models using tick questing data from the Scottish Highlands.

Summary: Fraser demonstrates that the Likelihood Ratio Test (LRT) may be applied to non-nested models by comparison of competing models, through comparison of simulated data sets.

Video with Shane Geange

Uploaded 22nd December 2010

Shane Geange talks about the development of new methods to combine data on ecological niche overlap, and demonstrates the R scripts and datasets distributed with this paper.

Summary: Shane explains the need for new indices to combine data from many different studies, allowing the creation of composite measures of mean niche overlap, which is of interest to population and community ecologists. Shane also demonstrates the R code developed to achieve this goal.

Tutorial by Francesco de Bello et al

Uploaded 3rd December 2010

Francesco de Bello, Sandra Lavorel, Cécile H. Albert, Wilfried Thuiller, Karl Grigulis, Jir(i Dolezal, Šte(pán Janec(ek and Jan Lepš provide a step-by-step tutorial on the the methodology proposed in their recently published work, providing additional insights into the preparation of data, the application of the proposed R scripts, and the interpretation of results.

Tutorial © 2010 Francesco de Bello, Sandra Lavorel, Cécile H. Albert, Wilfried Thuiller, Karl Grigulis, Jiri Dolezal, Štepán Janecek and Jan Lepš.

Video by Sara Kross and Ximena Nelson

Uploaded 2nd September 2010

Sara Kross, University of Canterbury, New Zealand, shows her fieldsite in New Zealand and a new portable low-cost remote videography system for monitoring wildlife, developed with Ximena Nelson.

Summary: Sara and Ximena developed this method to study the nesting behaviour of the New Zealand falcon in the New Zealand High Country. Sara shows that the camera is relatively cheap and easy to transport in a backpack. The camera uses solar batteries and compressed videos so that it can be left in the field for up to 4 days at a time. The footage recovered has been used so far for research but also for conservation and education purposes.

Volume 2

Issue 1

Video by Martin Lukac, Alexandru Milcu and Dennis Wildman

Uploaded 19th November 2010

Martin Lukac, Alexandru Milcu and Dennis Wildman talk about their recently published work on developing non-intrusive methods to monitor atmospheric carbon dioxide in analogue models of the terrestrial carbon cycle.

Summary: Martin, Alexandru and Dennis discuss the need for a broad spectrum of approaches in understanding the effects of atmospheric carbon dioxide, and demonstrate their innovative experimental equipment at the Imperial College Controlled Environment Facility, Silwood Park, UK.

Podcast with Freya Harrison

Uploaded 18th August 2010

Freya Harrison, University of Oxford, UK talks with Graziella Iossa, MEE Journal Co-ordinator, about her review on getting started with meta-analysis. This is a work likely to be of interest to a wide range of readers.

Image created by Freya Harrison, shows a plot of metadata

Summary: Freya explains that meta-analysis is a statistically robust way of putting together results from different studies that test the same hypothesis. She provides in this review a 'road map' to the topic so that beginners can get a head start on meta-analysis. Meta-analysis hopefully will be more used as a result in the fields of ecology and evolution.

Click on the play button to listen to this podcast, or listen to the podcast here. If you are experiencing any problem listening to the podcast, please download flash player. Figure © 2010 Freya Harrison.

Video by José J. Lahoz-Monfort

Uploaded 16th August 2010

José J. Lahoz-Monfort, University of Kent, UK, shows his fieldsite on the Isle of May, Scotland, and explains the background to his research drawing on a long-term study on the seasbirds of the island. His work, with co-authors Byron J.T. Morgan, Mike P. Harris, Sarah Wanless and Stephen N. Freeman, is titled A capture-recapture model for exploring multi-species synchrony in survival.

Summary: José J. Lahoz-Monfort explains what is the main idea behind his work with co-authors, "A capture-recapture model for exploring multi-species synchrony in survival". Their work looks at survival rates of three seabird species: the common guillemot, the razorbill and the Atlantic puffin. These three species of auks have similar ecology and are subject to the same environmental stochasticity so it is reasonable to expect some synchrony in the fluctuations of their demographic parameters.

Meetings

Integrating ecology into macroevolutionary research

Uploaded 10th May 2011

On the 9th of March, 2011, Methods in Ecology and Evolution sponsored "Integrating Ecology into Macroevolutionary Research", a symposium with over 200 delegates and 12 speakers, held at the Zoological Society of London meeting rooms.

Volume 1

Issue 4

Podcast with Jane Elith, Michael Kearney and Steven Phillips

Uploaded 19th May 2010

Jane Elith and Michael Kearney, University of Melbourne, Australia and Steven Phillips, AT&T, USA talk with Graziella Iossa, MEE Journal Co-ordinator, about their work: 'The art of modelling range-shifting species'.

Image created by Jane Elith and colleagues, shows a map of Australia

Summary: Jane explains that this is a method to predict species distributions, whose range are shifting, like invasive species or species responding to climate change. Mike Kearney then specifies why they used cane toads as a case study for their work. By taking characteristics of the animal and putting this information together they could ask from a physiological point of view, where cane toads could not live. They also asked how to bring together this mechanistic approach with more traditional approaches. This work advances methodology by combining information from physiological models to data in the correlation-based ones; by looking at details of how you can do the modelling; and by looking at tools for understanding models and data, something that a lot of people will find interesting. Then Steven explains about MaxEnt, a programme that models species distributions based on a machine-learning approach, developed with other colleagues and freely available on the web. For example a common use of the programme is predicting how climate change will affect species distributions. Finally, Mike reports that this method should be useful to anybody trying to predict species with unequal distributions. Jane also precises that students, managers, researchers could be potentially interested, especially given that MaxEnt is freely available.

Click on the play button to listen to this podcast or listen to the podcast here. If you are experiencing any problem listening to the podcast, please download flash player.Figure © 2010 Jane Elith, Michael Kearney and Steven Phillips.

Volume 1

Issue 3

Podcast with Art Munson

Uploaded 5th May 2010

Art Munson, Cornell University, USA, talks with Graziella Iossa, MEE Journal Co-ordinator, about his work with colleagues in developing a method for measuring the relative information content of data from different monitoring protocols.

Image created by Art Munson and colleagues, shows a map of the USA and Ebird data

Summary: Art presents a method to compare the information from two data sources. As often in ecology data are difficult to compare because they have been collected at different points in space and time, Art and colleagues propose using a model that summarises each of these data sources and allowing a direct comparison of the data. Their work advances methodology in ecology and evolution in two ways. At first they were analysing a citizen science project, the eBird dataset, which collects bird observations throughout the western hemisphere and there was a question of how much the biological information was being collected by this citizen science project. One outcome of their work found that eBird is collecting a lot of useful information. More generally, this method can be applied to verify data sources for lots of different purposes.

Click on the play button to listen to this podcast or listen to the podcast here. If you are experiencing any problem listening to the podcast, please download flash player. Figure © 2010 Art Munson.
 

PowerPoint Presentation with audio by David Watson

David Watson, Charles Sturt University, Australia, gives an overview of the research that forms the basis for his article and of the methods involved: Optimizing inventories of diverse sites—insights from Barro Colorado Island birds.

Summary: David talks of the challenges that researchers from ecologists to taxonomists face when sampling diverse sites for a whole range of species from plants to animals.

Click on the play button to watch and listen to this PowerPoint presentation. © 2010 David Watson.

Interview with Arnaud Tarroux

Uploaded 17th May 2010

Graziella Iossa interviews Arnaud Tarroux, Université du Québec à Rimouski, Canada, on his work with colleagues on the sensitivity of stable isotope mixing models to variation in isotopic ratios.

Summary: Arnaud Tarroux answers what is the main idea behind his work with co-authors, "Sensitivity of stable isotope mixing models to variation in isotopic ratios: evaluating consequences of lipid extraction". He states that in some systems it appears to be better to extract lipid before isotopic analysis and in other systems the contrary is true. Moreover, lipid extraction is costly, so their method is potentially really useful as a predictive tool in preliminary analyses. Their work is an important step in the issue of lipid extraction in stable isotope analysis and more generally, isotopic variation, which can be due to other factors. Arnaud then proceeds to show with a presentation his novel method and how the researchers using it can assess whether to extract lipids or not. Anyone working on stable isotope analysis with a goal to reconstructing diet could use their method.

Volume 1

Issue 2

Podcast with Karen Strier and Susan Alberts

Uploaded 7th April 2010

Karen Strier, University of Wisconsin-Madison, USA, and Susan Alberts, Duke University, USA and Institute of Primate Research, Kenya, talk with Graziella Iossa, MEE Journal Co-ordinator, about their work with co-authors: The Primate Life History Database.

Image created by Karen Strier and colleagues, shows a collection of images of primates

Summary: This online database is based on long-term datasets that researchers at several institutions in North America have created to make data comparable across studies. It will aid future comparative analyses of primate data and the creation of easily archivable output. The most important features of this database, as Susan points out, are its structure and the use of a common vocabulary. Karen and Susan hope that it will be applicable to studies of most vertabrates and certainly of mammals.

Click on the play button to listen to this podcast or listen to the podcast here. If you are experiencing any problem listening to the podcast, please download flash player. Figure © 2010 D.K. Brockman, C.B. Possomai, F.A. Campos, S.C. Alberts, Diane Fossey Gorilla Fund International, M. Cords & M. Wilson.

Podcast with Jean-Pierre Moussus

Uploaded 22nd March 2010

Graziella Iossa, MEE Journal Coordinator, interviews Jean-Pierre Moussus, MNHN - EGB about his work with co-authors Romain Julliard and Frederic Jiguet on phenological estimators using simulated data.

Figure created by Jean-Pierre Moussus and colleagues, shows a graph with two frequency distributions overlapping each other

Summary: Jean-Pierre explains about their article 'Featuring ten phenological estimators using simulated data' and how it will be able to inform anyone using phenological estimators.

Click on the play button to listen to this podcast or listen to the podcast here. If you are experiencing any problem listening to the podcast, please download flash player. Figure © 2010 Jean-Pierre Moussus, Romain Julliard and Frederic Jiguet.

Interview with Aaron Ellison

Uploaded 27th April 2010

Graziella Iossa interviews Aaron Ellison, Harvard Forest, Harvard University, USA, on his work with colleagues on experimentally testing the role of forest foundation species.

Summary: Aaron Ellison answers what is the main idea behind his work with co-authors, "Experimentally testing the role of foundation species in forests: the Harvard Forest Hemlock Removal Experiment". He states that there are two key pieces to his work: foundation species are key species that really 'make' ecosystems, secondly, they are studying an an adelgid that is killing the hemlocks in North America. Further, he explains how their large-scale controlled experiments, which are very difficult to conduct in normal circumstances, advance methodology in ecology and evolution. He explains how the findings of their study could be applied by theoretical researchers and the management community. Finally he encourages other researchers to use their facilities at Harvard Forest.
 

Interview with Douglas Barron

Uploaded 24th March 2010

Graziella Iossa interviews Doug Barron, University of Illinois, USA, on his work with colleagues on a meta-analysis on transmitter effects on bird ecology and behaviour.

Summary: Doug Barron answers what is the main idea behind his work with co-authors, "Meta-analysis of transmitter effects on avian behaviour and ecology". Further, he explains how their meta-analysis advances methodology in ecology and evolution and finally shows how the findings of their study could be applied by anyone using transmitters on birds.

Volume 1

Issue 1

Podcast with Matt Baker

Uploaded 25th February 2010

Graziella Iossa, MEE Journal Coordinator, interviews Matt Baker, University of Maryland-Baltimore County about his research paper with co-author Ryan King, Baylor University.

Art cover created by Matt Baker, shows a graph on a background of pines overlooking a river

Summary: Matt explains about TITAN, their new method for measuring ecological community thresholds that should be able to inform about conservation of rare and threatened species.

Click on the play button to listen to this podcast or listen to the podcast here. If you are experiencing any problem listening to the podcast, please download flash player. Artwork © 2010 Matt Baker.

Interview with Corey Bradshaw

Uploaded 9th February 2010

Graziella Iossa interviews Corey Bradshaw, University of Adelaide, on his work with colleagues on reducing invasive animal density.

Summary: Corey Bradshaw answers what is the main idea behind his work with co-authors, "Spatially explicit spreadsheet modelling for optimising the efficiency of reducing invasive animal density". Further, he explains how their model advances methodology in ecology and evolution and finally shows how it could be applied by wildlife manager and practitioners with basic knowledge of computer models. Their Excel-spreadsheet 'Spatio-Temporal Animal Reduction' (S.T.A.R.) model is designed specifically to optimise the culling strategies for feral pigs, buffalo and horses in Kakadu National Park (northern Australia), but Corey explains how their aim was to make it easy enough for anyone to use and modify it so that it could be applied to any invasive species anywhere.
 

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Centre for Ecology and Evolution's Spring Symposium 2011: Integrating Ecology into Macroevolution

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