Videos and podcasts 

View the newest Methods in Ecology and Evolution videos and podcasts below.
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An interview with David Borchers: Continuous-time SECR
Online 7th July 2014

David Warton interviews David Borchers, Reader in Statistics at the University of St Andrews, about his latest paper in MEE: Continuous-time spatially explicit capture-recapture models, with an application to a jaguar camera-trap survey.


 

An Introduction to Radar Image Processing in Ecology
Online 27th June 2014

Phillip Stepanian, Phillip Chilson and Jeffrey Kelly talk about the background and motivation behind their MEE paper 'An introduction to radar image processing in ecology', followed by a short tutorial.
Read the article: An Introduction to Radar Image Processing in Ecology


 

What method has transformed your field the most, during your career?
Online 19th February 2014

At INTECOL 2013, Methods’ Associate Editor, Barb Anderson, asked a number of delegates what method transformed their field the most, during their career. Visit the Methods blog to find out who gave the answers.

If you could invent a method, what would it be?
Online 9th January 2014

At INTECOL 2013, Methods’ Associate Editor, Barb Anderson, asked a number of delegates what method they would like to be invented. Visit the Methods blog to find out who gave the answers.

An interview with the Tea Bag Index team
Online 12th November 2013

The Tea Bag Index is an innovative, cost-effective, well-standardised method to gather data on decomposition rate and litter stabilisation using commercially available tea bags as standardised test kits. In this video, David Warton interviews 2 of the authors, Joost Keuskamp and Mariet Hefting from Utrecht University, who explain how it works and what they plan to do with it in the future.
Read the article: Tea Bag Index: a novel approach to collect uniform decomposition data across ecosystems


 

Tagging aquatic animals can disrupt natural behavior
Online 1st November 2013

In this video Todd Jones gives a summary of his recent study, which aims to increase our understanding of the impact that carrying electronic tags can have on aquatic animals. Does the increased drag have power implications? Do the tags themselves affect the behavior of the animals? To answer these questions Todd and his colleagues made cast models of sea turtles and put them in a wind tunnel to record the differences in drag force, with or without tags. They modeled the results to determine the %drag increase caused by different sized tags, and then discussed how much drag is acceptable for an organism before it's behavior is significantly altered, and also thought about the results from an animal welfare perspective.
Read the article: Calculating the ecological impacts of animal-borne instruments on aquatic organisms
Read the press release


 

An overview of the Methods blog
Online 31st October 2013

Methods' Senior Editor, Bob O'Hara, gives a quick overview of the blog:

An overview of the journal
Online 31st October 2013

Methods' Senior Editor, Bob O'Hara, gives a quick overview of the journal:

What are the oldest methods still being used?
Online 25th October 2013

At INTECOL 2013, Methods’ Associate Editor, Barb Anderson, asked a number of delegates what the oldest method is that they still use today? Visit the Methods blog to find out who gave the answers.

An interview with Noel Cressie
Online 9th October 2013

David Warton interviews Distinguished Professor Noel Cressie of the University of Wollongong, a big name in spatial statistics, advocate of hierarchical modeling in ecology, and author of a key reference text in spatial statistics, and more recently "Statistics for Spatio-temporal data" with Chris Wikle; in this video they discuss all of these topics.


 

An interview with Trevor Hastie
Online 30th August 2013

David Warton interviews Trevor Hastie, Professor of Statistics at Stanford University - a leading figure in the discipline who has been instrumental in the development and uptake of a range of modern analysis methods, including generalised additive models, the LASSO, and boosting. Trevor talks about his recent paper "Inference from presence-only data; the ongoing controversy" with Will Fithian published in Ecography, which is a response to Royle et al's "Likelihood analysis of species occurrence probability from presence-only data for modelling species distributions" in Methods in Ecology and Evolution.


 

Controlling error and stable isotope analysis
Online 15th July 2013

David Hawke from the Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, discusses his recently published paper "Closing the circle: how ecologists can prepare their own quality control material to increase confidence in stable isotope data".
Read the article: Closing the circle: how ecologists can prepare their own quality control material to increase confidence in stable isotope data


Volume 4

Issue 5

SURFACE: Detecting convergence with stepwise AIC
Online 20th February 2013

Travis Ingram gives a brief introduction to the new phylogenetic comparative method SURFACE. This method uses stepwise AIC to fit a series of stabilizing selection models to a phylogenetic tree and trait data, and to quantify the extent of convergent evolution toward the same selective regimes. The tutorial explains how SURFACE works, then shows an example analysis in R.
Read the article: SURFACE: detecting convergent evolution from comparative data by fitting Ornstein-Uhlenbeck models with stepwise AIC


 


Volume 4

Issue 3

Endoscopy rationale
Online 13th December 2012

In this short video, Sarah Burthe explains the rationale for developing endoscopy as a method for non-destructively measuring endoparasites in European shag hosts.
Read the article: Endoscopy as a novel method for assessing endoparasite burdens in free-ranging European shags (Phalacrocorax aristotelis)


 


Volume 3

Issue 6

Diversitree
Uploaded 29th October 2012

In this video, Mr Blueberry and Fairly-Small-Yellow-Bird disagree on how colour affects the diversification of birds. Rich FitzJohn shows them how to test their hypotheses using the comparative phylogenetic methods implemented in the R package "diversitree", recently described in the freely available Methods application paper "Diversitree: comparative phylogenetic analyses of diversification in R".
Download diversitree from [CRAN] here.
Download a tutorial and worked examples here.


 

Movebank tutorial
Made public 11th October 2012

This short video provides a useful tutorial on how to run the Douglas Argos filter (an algorithm that flags implausible locations) in Movebank, a free online infrastructure for storing, managing, sharing and analysing animal movement data.
You can read the accompanying article here: Moderating Argos location errors in animal tracking data
You can also view this video on Methods YouTube channel.
 


 

Understanding the causes and consequences of animal movement
Uploaded 9th October 2012

In this video, John Fieberg discusses some of the challenges associated with inferring causal relationships among animal movement characteristics and indicators of an animal's physiological condition. Specifically, he and co-author Mark Ditmer explore models that relate estimates of daily movement rates to average daily heart rates (collected using surgically implanted heart monitors) in conjunction with a biotelemetry study involving black bears (Ursus americanus). They show that estimates of regression parameters are sensitive to the assumed error structure, they suggest this sensitivity is due to endgoeneity of the predictor variable(s), and they use directed acyclical graphs to develop potential explanations for the observed endogeneity. The implications of this work are relevant to most studies that make use of biotelemetry data.
You can read the accompanying forum article here: Understanding the causes and consequences of animal movement: a cautionary note on fitting and interpreting regression models with time-dependent covariates
You can also view this video on Methods YouTube channel.
 


 

FlexParamCurve - A Tutorial
Uploaded 26th September 2012

In this R tutorial, Steve Oswald (Penn State) walks us through coded examples of FlexParamCurve's main functionality: selecting which curve to use, fitting/plotting, and analyzing in nlme().
Make sure you didn't miss the the preceding introductory video, where Steve and Andre Chiaradia (Phillip Island) discuss how 'FlexParamCurve' makes nonlinear curve fitting accessible for non-monotonic parametric curves, through automated curve selection and parametrisation in a mixed effects model framework.


 

FlexParamCurve - An Introduction
Uploaded 26th September 2012

Steve Oswald (Penn State) and Andre Chiaradia (Phillip Island) discuss how 'FlexParamCurve' makes nonlinear curve fitting accessible for non-monotonic parametric curves, through automated curve selection and parametrisation in a mixed effects model framework. They visit Phillip Island's Penguin Parade to introduce avian growth as one application.
Don't miss the subsequent R tutorial video, where Steve walks us through coded examples of FlexParamCurve's main functionality: selecting which curve to use, fitting/plotting, and analyzing in nlme().


Volume 3

Issue 5

Modelling dispersal-limited species
Uploaded 16th October

This video accompanies a recently published article that deals with the problems of predicting non-native species distribution. One of the authors, Martin Sullivan, runs us through the use dispersion weighting models to overcome these problems, and discusses their results and conclusions when applied to a real case study of the distribution of common waxbill Estrilda astrild in the Iberian Peninsula.

Read the article: Using dispersal information to model the species–environment relationship of spreading non-native species
Watch the video on our YouTube channel.
 


 

 

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